Trilogy (Remastered) Emerson, Lake & Palmer

Album Info

Album Veröffentlichung:
1972

HRA-Veröffentlichung:
28.09.2016

Label: BMG

Genre: Rock

Subgenre: Classic Rock

Das Album enthält Albumcover

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  • 1The Endless Enigma, Pt. 106:40
  • 2Fugue01:56
  • 3The Endless Enigma, Pt. 202:02
  • 4From the Beginning04:14
  • 5The Sheriff03:22
  • 6Hoedown03:46
  • 7Trilogy08:51
  • 8Living Sin03:10
  • 9Abaddons Bolero08:05
  • Total Runtime42:06

Info zu Trilogy (Remastered)

For an album that begins with an extended two-part piece called "The Endless Enigma" (bifurcated by something called "Fugue") and closes with a rock bolero, „Trilogy“ is surprisingly song-oriented and accessible. As usual, the long instrumental sections are dominated by Emerson's madman organ work and monophonic synth lines. These are interspersed, however with strong melodic/lyrical statements from Greg Lake, making the whole thing cohere more than anyone had any right to expect. The light-hearted Old West motif of "The Sheriff" (complete with honky tonk piano) and an Emersonized version of Copland's "Hoedown" add valuable humor. The ominous "Living Sin" features one of Lake's nastiest vocals, and the title cut ranks among ELP's finest pseudo-classical moments.

„After the heavily distorted bass and doomsday church organ of Emerson, Lake & Palmer's debut album, the exhilarating prog rock of epic proportions on Tarkus, and the violent removal of the sacred aura of classical tunes on Pictures at an Exhibition, Trilogy, ELP's fourth album, features the trio settling down in more crowd-pleasing pastures. Actually, the group was gaining in maturity what they lost in raw energy. Every track on this album has been carefully thought, arranged, and performed to perfection, a process that also included some form of sterilization. Greg Lake's acoustic ballad "From the Beginning" put the group on the charts for a second time. The adaptation of Aaron Copland's "Hoedown" also yielded a crowd-pleaser. Prog rock fans had to satisfy themselves with the three-part "The Endless Enigma" and "Trilogy," both very strong but paced compositions. By 1972, Eddie Offord's recording and producing techniques had reached a peak. He provided a lush, comfy finish to the album that made it particularly suited for living-room listening and the FM airwaves. Yet the material lacks a bit of excitement. Trilogy still belongs to ELP's classic period and should not be overlooked. For newcomers to prog rock it can even make a less-menacing point of entry.“ (François Couture, AMG)

Keith Emerson, Hammond organ C3, Steinway piano, Moog synthesizer III-C, Mini-Moog
Greg Lake, vocals, electric and acoustic guitars, bass guitar
Carl Palmer, drums, percussion

Recorded October 1971, January 1972, Advision Studios, London, England
Engineered by Eddy Offord
Mastering by Barry Diament
Produced by Greg Lake

Digitally remastered


Emerson, Lake & Palmer
Considered by many to be one of rock’s original first super-groups, Emerson Lake & Palmer formed in England in 1970 consisting of Keith Emerson (keyboards), Greg Lake (bass guitar, vocals, guitar) and Carl Palmer (drums, percussion). The band created a brand new world of music, combining classical and symphonic rock fused with beautiful vocals. Their penchant for appropriating themes from classical music and the group’s more nuanced, textured approach to symphonic arrangements set ELP apart from their more bombastic guitar-based contemporaries of the time. This subtler and more sublime approach carries on today in the expansive atmospherics of Radiohead and Muse and also in the prog-influenced sphere of band’s like Porcupine Tree, Dream Theatre, Opeth and many others, making ELP one of the more relevant torchbearers of the progressive rock sound. Along with Yes, King Crimson, Genesis, and Rush, Emerson Lake and Palmer ushered in the Prog era and as one of the most commercially successful rock bands of the 1970’s having sold over 40 million albums. ELP’s dramatic flair, sincere passion, labyrinthine song structures, and symphony-worthy virtuosity proved that classical rockers could compete for arena-scale audiences as the band headlined stadium tours around the world.

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