Bricks Against The Glass Lori Lieberman

Cover Bricks Against The Glass

Album info

Album-Release:
2013

HRA-Release:
29.11.2019

Label: Driveonrecords

Genre: Songwriter

Subgenre: Contemporary

Album including Album cover Booklet (PDF)

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Formats & Prices

FormatPriceIn CartBuy
FLAC 96 $ 12.80
DSD 64 $ 14.90
  • 1Ticket To Leave03:42
  • 2Truly03:44
  • 3Lottery05:37
  • 4Bricks Against The Glass04:28
  • 5On These Streets/San Francisco05:09
  • 6Rise04:20
  • 7The End Of Our Story05:12
  • 8It’s Another New Day04:05
  • 9Elephants05:09
  • 10The Rest Will Follow05:21
  • 11Bricks Against The Glass (Unplugged)04:34
  • 12Killing Me Softly (Bounus Track)04:34
  • 13Water (Bonus Track)03:58
  • Total Runtime59:53

Info for Bricks Against The Glass



Leonard Cohen came up on stage in one of her concerts and sang “Bird On A Wire”. Don McLean invited her to be a part of his documentary, “American Troubadour,” Judy Collins called her a gifted songwriter.Highly regarded among her peers and younger artists alike, this legendary artist has gone on to record LP after CD, gleaning the respect of an ever-changing industry a loyal and devoted base of fans.

Best known for Killing Me Softly”, written during her Troubadour days in Los Angeles when her girlfriend, writer Michele Willens, took her to a Don McLean in concert, she developed her producing and arranging skills into a career that has spanned over fifteen albums.

Featured in author, Leo Blokhuis’ book, “Sounds Of The West Coast” which won the Golden Tulip Award, he devotes a chapter that details Lori Lieberman’s early music — California in the seventies, the Sunset Strip and the West Coast club circuit that included singer-songwriters such as Joni Mitchell, Jackson Browne, and The Eagles.

A true full circle moment occurred a few weeks ago, when she met Don McLean for the first time at his concert in Los Angeles, where he credited the song to Lori Lieberman, and sang its inspiration, “Empty Chairs”, to her.

Born in Los Angeles but raised in Switzerland, among Lieberman’s early musical influences were Francoise Hardy, Tom Rush, Cat Stevens “and anything from the States I could get my hands on”.

After attending University in Boston, she signed her first record deal with Capitol Records. The next five LPs on that label included some of the leading studio musicians– a young Larry Carlton, members of the “L.A. Express”, Sneaky Pete, and pianist Joe Sample. She toured the U.S. with Randy Newman, Billy Joel, Leonard Cohen, John Sebastian and Rick Nelson, to name a few.

For several years,as the music business went from acoustic to disco, Lori Lieberman spent time away in the hills of Malibu to raise three children. She returned to recording under the guidance of Joseph Cali, who first had the idea to record her with his then partner, Mark Levinson, as a two mic live experience.

She was nominated for the Golden Note Award for excellence with “A Thousand Dreams”, on Pope Music, and two CDs followed– “Home Of Whispers”, and “Gone Is The Girl”, became staples of the Audiophile community, who embraced her stunning songs, warm vocals and rich orchestrations. Rich Warren, of WFMT Chicago, named “Home Of Whispers” as his number one, most recommended CD of that year.

With the release of “Monterey”, on Drive On Records, co-produced by Lori Lieberman and Joseph Cali, with songs composed and arranged by Lieberman, she toured the U.S., receiving airplay as the Indie market increased, highlighting her natural and acoustic sound.

“Gun Metal Sky”, released in 2009, marked her debut as an orchestrator for strings and woodwinds. While most of the songs were self-penned, she included interesting and unique versions of songs by some of our most beloved songwriters—Emmylou Harris, The Bee Gees, Paul Simon, and the Hollies. Three songs were added to Sirius Radio’s “The Loft”, and performances that included the City Winery in New York, and a premiere concert tour of the Netherlands led to distribution throughout Europe, and a deal with V2 Records.

Lori Lieberman’s fourteenth CD, “Bend Like Steel” a raw and honest recording, engineered by Joseph Cali, shows a more vulnerable Lieberman, who delves into subjects that reveal her as one of our best storytellers.Featuring songs that are mostly self-penned, she re-imagines Paul Simon’s “Cecilia”, and revisits “There’s A Harbor” from her first LP on Capitol Records and features Lieberman on guitar and piano with guest artists that include Lyle Workman (Sting, Beck), and mastered by Gavin Lurssen (Allison Krauss, T Bone Burnett).

Having just returned from a solo concert tour in the UK and Netherlands, she is releasing her newest CD, “Bricks Against The Glass“. It is her finest work to date- each song, finely honed and more poignant than the next, reflects the songwriter who has seen it all but continues to learn, grow, and changed. That stellar voice still exists, but the variety, breadth, and range of ear song reminds one of a classic masterpiece- how long has it been since there was a collection of songs that beckoned us to sit and listen from start to finish and follow along with this magnificent journey? Musicians adding their talents are: Lyle Workman (Beck, Sting), Jason Orne (Alanis Morrisette), Ryan MacMillan (Matchbox 20), Timothy Drury (The Eagles), and mastered at Wisseloord Studios, Netherlands, by Grammy Award winner, Darcy Proper.

“Lieberman’s songs are miniatures — portraits of love gained and lost. …….. They’re less about what’s seen than what’s felt. They shine a little light on lives that never make the headlines. And about ideas that are very familiar and rarely celebrated…” (Jesse Kornbluth, Vanity Fair, Headbutler.com)

“..this set, though delicate as gossamer, is heart-ripped-open raw. Closely mic’d to perfection, the anguished interpretation of Simon and Garfunkel’s normally jolly “Cecilia” will turn your head around” (Ken Kessler, Hi Fi News Album Choice)

“Bend Like Steel” is some of the best work you’ve done. It’s tied in my estimation with “Home of Whispers,” and you know in what high esteem I hold that CD. Beautiful, beautiful work. And your voice has never sounded better." (Rich Warren, WFMT Midnight Special, Chicago)

"That this was engineered using PMC monitors, with an audiophile at the helm, will not surprise those who know Lori Leiberman as a hi-fi fave. Of greater relevance is content even more personal and intimate than the sparkling arrangements might suggest. The title track, which wouldn't have seemed out of place on an early Eagles LP, promises a West Coast sonic experience but quickly moves into a circa-1968 Cambridge (Massachusetts) coffee shop confessional. ... All are unmistakably Lieberman, delivered in that breathy voice that lulls you into thinking she's singing only for you." (Sound Quality: 90%, Ken Kessler, Hi-Fi News)

Lori Lieberman, guitar, piano
Timothy Drury, keyboards, piano
Lyle Workman, guitar
Jason Orme, guitar
Daniel Lavery, bass
Ryan MacMillan, drums
Stefanie Fife, cello
Celine Cairo, vocals (on "Rise")
Jonathan Clark, vocals (on "Rise")

Produced by Joseph Cali and Lori Lieberman


Lori Lieberman
Born in Los Angeles but raised in Switzerland, Lieberman expressed her feelings early on in journals and in song. One of three sisters, her early musical influences began with Donovan, Francoise Hardy, and Dionne Warwick, but her inspirations shifted when her sister returned from college in Maine, and gifted Lori with her favorite music from U.S. which included Joni Mitchell, Judy Collins, and Tom Rush. “I finally felt at home with their musical sensibilities and their writing really reached into my heart, “ she says. She began to write her own material, playing in high school bands and later, in college in Boston, before landing her first record deal with Capitol Records in the early 1970s.

Lieberman went on to record five more albums for Capitol (Lori Lieberman, Becoming, A Piece of Time, Straw Colored Girl, and The Best of Lori Lieberman), which featured a young Larry Carlton, Joe Sample, Merry Clayton, and members of the LA Express, to name a few. She toured extensively throughout the U.S. and Europe, along with Billy Joel, Randy Newman, John Sebastian, and others. However, it was her association with a little known New York–based record label, Millennium/RCA, that she was most encouraged to step away from the mainstream. Under Jimmy Ienner’s guidance, she wrote one of her most candid collections of songs entitled Letting Go.

As the styles of the music industry changed from James Taylor to disco, Ms. Lieberman struggled to create music that fit in. “One awful meeting led to another until the day I walked into a publisher’s office,” she says, recalling the moment she called it quits. “He put his hand up as if to say, ‘hold on’ while he continued to discuss his dinner plans. I waited, got up, and left. I remember thinking, ‘I’m done.’ And I was.” With a mischievous laugh, she adds, “The same publisher is now a realtor and has friend-requested me on Facebook… I think I’ll make him wait!”

Lieberman focused on her family life, the mother of three children (Em, Daniel, and Will), and stayed away from the music business for the next 15 years. She regards that time as one of the happiest and most fulfilling of all, and yet, she secretly kept on writing songs that no one heard, in her small studio in the upstairs corner of her home.

Her music took a backseat until producer and audiophile, Joseph Cali, coaxed a reluctant Lieberman out of the shadows, and got her singing again. In the time spent away from the music business, Cali was surprised to find that she had continued writing, putting her thoughts and music in her secret archive. He had an idea to involve his former partner in Cello Music and Film, engineer Mark Levinson, to create a two-mic live experience with Lieberman for the audiophile community.



<#!EN!#

Lori Lieberman
Born in Los Angeles but raised in Switzerland, Lieberman expressed her feelings early on in journals and in song. One of three sisters, her early musical influences began with Donovan, Francoise Hardy, and Dionne Warwick, but her inspirations shifted when her sister returned from college in Maine, and gifted Lori with her favorite music from U.S. which included Joni Mitchell, Judy Collins, and Tom Rush. “I finally felt at home with their musical sensibilities and their writing really reached into my heart, “ she says. She began to write her own material, playing in high school bands and later, in college in Boston, before landing her first record deal with Capitol Records in the early 1970s.

Lieberman went on to record five more albums for Capitol (Lori Lieberman, Becoming, A Piece of Time, Straw Colored Girl, and The Best of Lori Lieberman), which featured a young Larry Carlton, Joe Sample, Merry Clayton, and members of the LA Express, to name a few. She toured extensively throughout the U.S. and Europe, along with Billy Joel, Randy Newman, John Sebastian, and others. However, it was her association with a little known New York–based record label, Millennium/RCA, that she was most encouraged to step away from the mainstream. Under Jimmy Ienner’s guidance, she wrote one of her most candid collections of songs entitled Letting Go.

As the styles of the music industry changed from James Taylor to disco, Ms. Lieberman struggled to create music that fit in. “One awful meeting led to another until the day I walked into a publisher’s office,” she says, recalling the moment she called it quits. “He put his hand up as if to say, ‘hold on’ while he continued to discuss his dinner plans. I waited, got up, and left. I remember thinking, ‘I’m done.’ And I was.” With a mischievous laugh, she adds, “The same publisher is now a realtor and has friend-requested me on Facebook… I think I’ll make him wait!”

Lieberman focused on her family life, the mother of three children (Em, Daniel, and Will), and stayed away from the music business for the next 15 years. She regards that time as one of the happiest and most fulfilling of all, and yet, she secretly kept on writing songs that no one heard, in her small studio in the upstairs corner of her home.

Her music took a backseat until producer and audiophile, Joseph Cali, coaxed a reluctant Lieberman out of the shadows, and got her singing again. In the time spent away from the music business, Cali was surprised to find that she had continued writing, putting her thoughts and music in her secret archive. He had an idea to involve his former partner in Cello Music and Film, engineer Mark Levinson, to create a two-mic live experience with Lieberman for the audiophile community.

Booklet for Bricks Against The Glass

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